Common Disorders

Common Disorders

Achilles Tendonitis and Achilles Tendonosis - Occurring in the heel, Achilles tendonitis is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon. Although typically short-lived, if not resolved, it may progress to Achilles tendonosis which is degeneration of the tendon in which it loses its organized structure and is likely to develop microscopic tears. Sometimes the degeneration involves the site where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone. In rare cases, chronic degeneration with or without pain may result in rupture of the tendon.

Bunions - A bunion is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe, but it is more than that. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the bony framework of the front part of the foot. The big toe leans toward the second toe, rather than pointing straight ahead. This throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’s “bump.” Bunions are a progressive disorder. They begin with a leaning of the big toe, gradually changing the angle of the bones over the years and slowly producing the characteristic bump, which becomes increasingly prominent.

Calluses - A callus is a thickened area of skin on the foot caused by pressure and repeated rubbing, such as from a shoe or sock. The rubbing causes the skin to produce a layer of protective skin (a callus). Calluses vary in size, and can become painful. There are a number of treatments for painful calluses. People who have calluses are cautioned against performing “bathroom surgery,” as this can lead to cuts and infection. A foot and ankle surgeon can evaluate the cause of the calluses and recommend the treatment most appropriate for your condition. However, if the underlying cause of the callus is not treated or removed, the callus may return.

Corns - A "corn" is a small circular thickened lesion in the skin of the foot. It usually forms due to repeated pressure on the skin, such as the rubbing of a shoe. The name "corn" comes from its resemblance to a kernel of corn. A corn is different from a callus in that it has a central core of hard material. People with foot deformities, such as hammertoes, often suffer from corns because the tops of the bent toes rub against the tops of shoes. There are a number of treatment options for corns. When corns get hard enough to cause pain, a foot and ankle surgeon will recommend the treatment option most appropriate for you. However, if the underlying cause of the corn is not treated or removed, the corn may return. It is important to avoid trying to remove a corn at home or using medicated corn pads, as serious infection may occur.

Custom Orthotic Devices - Custom orthotics are medical devices prescribed by a foot and ankle surgeon. These shoe inserts, which support and align the foot and lower extremities, are formed by making a plaster mold of the foot.

Flexible Flatfoot - Typically beginning in childhood or adolescence and continuing into adulthood, it usually occurs in both feet and progresses in severity throughout the adult years. As the deformity worsens, the soft tissues (tendons and ligaments) of the arch may stretch or tear and can become inflamed. The term “flexible” means that while the foot is flat when standing, the arch returns when not standing.

Hammertoes - Usually start out as mild deformities and get progressively worse over time. In the earlier stages, hammertoes are flexible and the symptoms can often be managed with noninvasive measures. But if left untreated, hammertoes can become more rigid and will not respond to non-surgical treatment. Because of the progressive nature of hammertoes, they should receive early attention.

Heel Pain - Most often caused by plantar fasciitis, a condition that is sometimes also called heel spur syndrome when a spur is present. Heel pain may also be due to other causes, such as a stress fracture, tendonitis, arthritis, nerve irritation, or, rarely, a cyst. Because there are several potential causes, it is important to have heel pain properly diagnosed. A foot and ankle surgeon is able to distinguish between all the possibilities and determine the underlying source of your heel pain.

Ingrown Toenail - When a toenail is ingrown, it is curved and grows into the skin, usually at the sides of the nail. This “digging in” of the nail irritates the skin, often creating pain, redness, swelling, and warmth in the toe. If an ingrown nail causes a break in the skin, bacteria may enter and cause an infection in the area, which is often marked by drainage and a foul odor. However, even if the toe isn’t painful, red, swollen, or warm, a nail that curves downward into the skin can progress to an infection.

Nail Fungus - A fungus is an organism that lives in warm moist areas. Fungus of the toenails is a common problem that can affect people of all ages, although it most commonly affects individuals who are older. Toenail fungus often begins as an infection in the skin commonly known as athlete’s foot. The fungus often starts under the nail fold at the end of the nail. Over time it grows underneath the nail and causes changes to its appearance, such as a yellow or brownish discoloration. It can also cause thickening and deformity of the toenail.

Neuroma - A neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissue that may develop in various parts of the body. The most common neuroma in the foot is a Morton’s neuroma, which occurs between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas may also occur in other locations in the foot. The thickening, or enlargement, of the nerve that defines a neuroma is the result of compression and irritation of the nerve. This compression creates enlargement of the nerve, eventually leading to permanent nerve damage.

Brunswick Office

Located in Southeast Georgia Health System Outpatient Care Building

2500 Starling St #301
Brunswick, GA 31520
Monday - Thursday: 8am - 5pm
Friday: 8am - 2pm
(912) 265-4766

Hinesville Office

Conveniently located directly across from the National Guard Armory

600 E Oglethorpe Hwy
Hinesville, GA 31313
Monday and Tuesday: 9am - 4pm
(912) 368-3036

Brunswick Office

Located in Southeast Georgia Health System Outpatient Care Building

2500 Starling St #301
Brunswick, GA 31520
Monday - Thursday: 8am - 5pm
Friday: 8am - 2pm
(912) 265-4766

Hinesville Office

Conveniently located directly across from the National Guard Armory

600 E Oglethorpe Hwy
Hinesville, GA 31313
Monday and Tuesday: 9am - 4pm
(912) 368-3036